A Nemesis

Common Ravens Common Ravens perched in Rabbitbrush – D200, f8, 1/750, ISO 400, EV +0.3, 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

When I lived in Florida I had a few nemesis birds, the American Oystercatcher was one of them. I tried and tried to get the images of them I wanted. They are challenging to photograph because of the whites, blacks and reds. One morning while photographing them on the beach I was able to get the photos of them I wanted.  After those first images, it seemed like every time I went to the beach to photograph birds I got wonderful images of the oystercatchers.

Then there were the Loggerhead Shrikes. The light wasn’t right, the birds were flighty, the angle was too steep, there were branches in the way. The list could go on for quite sometime. But then I got the shots I was looking for and another nemesis bird wasn’t a nemesis anymore. My portfolio now has a bounty of Loggerhead Shrike images.

For a long time I have wanted Raven images, they are intelligent birds, a challenge to photograph because of the blacks in their plumage and they seem to just stay out of my reach. I see them, they take off. They stay around and the light is awful.  A nemesis bird for me.

A few weeks ago I took this image of a pair of Common Ravens (Corvus corax) perched in a Rabbitbush. It isn’t perfect, I was too close to get full body shots and the ravens were obscured by the vegetation.

I won’t give up, I’ll keep trying to get the images of this species that I desire and then they will no longer be a nemesis bird for me.

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About Mia McPherson

I am a nature lover, wildlife watcher and a bird photographer. I first become serious about bird photography when I moved to Florida in 2004 and it wasn’t long before I was hooked (addicted is more like it). My move to the Salt Lake area of Utah was a great opportunity to continue observing their behavior and photographing birds. My approach is to photograph the birds without disturbing their natural behavior. I don't bait, use set ups or call them in. I use Nikon gear and has multiple camera bodies and lenses.

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