Double-crested Cormorant – Friday Photos

Double-crested Cormorant on the shore of the Gulf of Mexico, Florida

 Double-crested Cormorant on the shore of the Gulf of Mexico, Florida –  Nikon D200, handheld, f7.1, 1/500, ISO 160, Nikkor 80-400mm VR at 300mm, natural light

Double-crested Cormorants are the most widespread of North American cormorants where they are found in salt and freshwater habitats. Double-crested Cormorants pursue fish under the water and because of their webbed feet they can swim rapidly. They can live up to 18 years and their status is secure. I love how their dark plumage sets of the beautiful blue eyes and orangish colored facial skin.

Mia

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About Mia McPherson

I am a nature lover, wildlife watcher and a bird photographer. I first become serious about bird photography when I moved to Florida in 2004 and it wasn’t long before I was hooked (addicted is more like it). My move to the Salt Lake area of Utah was a great opportunity to continue observing their behavior and photographing birds. My approach is to photograph the birds without disturbing their natural behavior. I don't bait, use set ups or call them in. I use Nikon gear and has multiple camera bodies and lenses.

14 Comments

  1. Beautiful capture Mia! The detail is excellent!

  2. Gorgeous photos, I love their eyes.

  3. Great capture of the colors and texture of the face Mia.

  4. Mia, what a gorgeous shot! I love how you captured that eye! We have a lot of these here in Louisville, KY near the river. I am still hoping to get a close enough or clear enough shot to capture those beautiful eyes! Nice work!

    • Karen, thank you for you comment. The Double-crested Cormorants we have here don’t have such a vivid blue eye, ours are a bit duller in color but I think the whitish crests here compared to the black ones in FL are fascinating.

  5. Cormorants are such great birds, you took a very nice photo of this one Mia.

  6. I really like Cormorants too. Their eyes are stunning and their beak looks like it’s made of polished quartz. It’s nice to see on down on the sand too, on a more natural habitat than on the gross peers and canal spillways where I see them in Phoenix.

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