With the large volume of photos I take each month it feels like I am always behind on editing images to post here on my blog and in my galleries, these Eastern Kingbird images are from June of this year and I just got around to processing them this morning.

Eastern Kingbird with tilted headEastern Kingbird with tilted head – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1250, ISO 400, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

The scientific name of Eastern Kingbirds is Tyrannus tyrannus, Tyrannus means “tyrant” and they are well named because they will harass any bird that comes near their nests including crows, ravens and much larger birds like hawks. They are fierce.

Eastern Kingbird perched on a wireEastern Kingbird perched on a wire – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1250, ISO 400, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

Eastern Kingbirds feed primarily on insects and will “hawk” from wires, posts and branches to pounce on their prey. They also hover above the ground and then swoop down to snatch insects.

Eastern Kingbird with preyEastern Kingbird with prey – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1000, ISO 400, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

The prey items I have seen Eastern Kingbirds with most often are dragonflies, crickets, grasshoppers and caterpillars.

Eastern Kingbird back viewEastern Kingbird back view – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1000, ISO 400, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

Eastern Kingbirds are migratory and spend the winter in tropical locations. I haven’t been seeing many of them lately so perhaps they have already begun to migrate to the south.

Mia