I don’t know why I like this image

I don't know why I like this imageI don’t know why I like this image

Yesterday I posted an image of the Centennial Valley and Mountain Range and I could easily put my finger on why I liked the image but with this photo of a rock formation and mountain slope in the background I can’t seem to figure out why I like it so much.

It doesn’t have a bird or animal in it, it doesn’t have a grand view of the area. It doesn’t evoke a specific memory. It isn’t an iconic location, it is simply a rock formation with a mountain slope in the background.

Perhaps sometimes we like what we like in an image without a reason that we can put a finger on. Or maybe that is just me.

Mia

* I am away in the wilderness and will only have limited access to the internet. Please feel free to share this post with your family and friends or any nature lover.

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About Mia McPherson

I am a nature lover, wildlife watcher and a bird photographer. I first become serious about bird photography when I moved to Florida in 2004 and it wasn’t long before I was hooked (addicted is more like it). My move to the Salt Lake area of Utah was a great opportunity to continue observing their behavior and to pursue my passion for photographing birds.

11 Comments

  1. lool for your title,
    me too, i like it, nice composition with forms and bokhe, it works very well =)))

  2. I think it might be, because the shape of the rock and the trees are similar. I like it as well.

  3. For me, I see the head of a bird when I see this ;).. a crested something

  4. Merrill Ann Gonzales

    The first thing I see is the rhythm of the forms between the trees and the rock formation. Well, really, the FIRST thing I saw was the incredible rock formation… the curiosity it raises… Is that rusting? or is it some other element causing the markings in the rock? That rock holds many mysteries that would take a geologist to explore and explain. But getting back to the rhythm… any time you have a pattern of similar and repeating forms it creates a sort of visual music…. Enjoy the tune… Enjoy the mystery… I know I am…. Many thanks.

  5. I agree that nature is simply beautiful and that’s all we need to appreciate it. From a design standpoint what leaped out to me is how the rock mirrors the images of the evergreens. You have nearly the same angle point on the evergreens immediately to the rock’s right, then your eye widens out to encompass the entire treeline and picks up the smaller trees closer to the rock. It’s perfectly laid-out from a designer’s point of view :-)

    Hope you’re having a fun trip!

  6. WHY??? I think Elephant’s Child and Dick Harlow nailed it. Why analyze…just enjoy nature’s beauty, contrasts, and magnificent sculpture. What artist, dead or alive, can paint, sculpt, create more beauty than nature itself?

  7. =) I’m sure there’s some rationale re: how the photo directs your eye into a loop, but it doesn’t matter. You like it, so it is good. I have a shot of a flower and a bee flying toward it, and tho’ the bee is totally out of focus, it just makes me happy. Good enough. =)

  8. For me it is the juxtaposition. Makes my eye stop and my mind go hmm.

  9. I like it because it is beautiful. The contrast between the hard edged rock, and strong colours against the softer, almost misty background make for a very appealing image.
    And sometimes, just knowing that we like something is enough. I have a tendency to over analyse and sometimes accepting that something ‘just is’ is enough.

  10. I like the craggyness and the lichens, the color, the shape of the rock. It makes one think how tough this rock is while it is standing alone in the wilderness. Imagine what has gone on around this rock over time.

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