Peregrine Falcon in flight

Peregrine Falcon in flightPeregrine Falcon in flight – Nikon D300, f6.3, 1/640, ISO 500, +1.0 EV, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light, not baited

Last month while camping near Capitol Reef National Park I was delighted to find a Peregrine Falcon feeding on prey near some Sandhill Cranes in a field that I had been photographing. I was surprised and felt as giddy as a child at Christmas because Peregrine Falcons are a species I don’t have in my viewfinder very often and when I do they are usually too far away to get decent photographs.

This Peregrine gave some nice views as it flew by several times that evening and I enjoyed this photo a lot because of the pose, the direct eye contact and by being able to see that its tail was still bloody from its last meal.

Mia

Additional posts you might enjoy:

About Mia McPherson

I am a nature lover, wildlife watcher and a bird photographer. I first become serious about bird photography when I moved to Florida in 2004 and it wasn’t long before I was hooked (addicted is more like it). My move to the Salt Lake area of Utah was a great opportunity to continue observing their behavior and to pursue my passion for photographing birds.

8 Comments

  1. Jane Chesebrough

    Great capture , Mia, they fly fast and are not easy to capture so this is quite the find. I heard a man on the radio who live-traps pigeons as an alternative to poisoning which some workers were doing-it has saved the local falcons who like to feed on pigeons.

  2. Majesty – and beauty. Megathanks.

  3. Outstanding image. Very similar to the African Lanner falcon which flies in the birdshow at Hogle Zoo, chasing at high speed a leather lure swinging in circles above Steve’s head. “They are especially prized for their ability to capture other birds, such as pigeons or grouse. Lanners are fast, agile flyers, and not afraid to follow prey into underbrush. Unlike Peregrines, who are famed for the 200 mph dives (called “stoops” in falconry), Lanners use a horizontal hunting style, coming at their prey low, flat, and fast. Generating speeds of up to 90 mph using wingbeats alone, Lanners will strike a bird in flight to stun it, then follow it to the ground to finish the kill.” [avery.org] And I’ve noticed the Peregrine’s talons are much larger than the Lanner’s.

  4. Very nice image! Don’t you love that giddy feeling?

  5. How wonderful for you. There is nothing like spotting and photographing
    someone you have yearned for. Thank you!

Comments are closed