Moose cowMoose cow – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1000, ISO 640, -0.3 EV, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

Yesterday we headed up Skyline Drive at the entrance to Bountiful Canyon to see if we could find any migrating raptors riding the thermals of the Wasatch Mountain Range and while that wasn’t a “bountiful” activity finding a Moose and her calf  feeding near a beaver pond was. The cow came down the hill first and at that point I couldn’t see that a calf was close behind her.

Young Moose - Oh, oh, she saw meOh, oh, she saw me – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1600, ISO 640, -0.3 EV, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

This calf was born in May or June and it has grown quite a bit since then. It has also gotten a longer neck, when the calves are first born their necks appear very short, almost neckless in appearance, you can see one here. This calf paid far more attention to our presence than the cow did.

Moose calf with its eye on meMoose calf with its eye on me – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1250, ISO 640, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

The Moose calf was wandering and feeding on different vegetation and when I saw this pose I just had to take a picture, it isn’t often I get to photograph a Moose’s rear end, I am far more proficient at getting images of bird rear ends!

Running Moose calfRunning Moose calf – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/1600, ISO 640, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

The calf seemed to be nervous at times by something that was to the north of it and it would run towards where the cow was feeding but would stop near some tall trees.

Running again!Running again! – Nikon D300, f7.1, 1/800, ISO 640, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

And at times it would turn and run the opposite direction. Maybe it was just stretching its legs or “feeling its oats” but I do know one thing for certain and that is I was delighted and amused with both of the Moose yesterday.

Mia