It is tough being a bird photographer when it comes to Burrowing Owls

/, Box Elder County, Burrowing Owls, Utah/It is tough being a bird photographer when it comes to Burrowing Owls

A juvenile Burrowing Owl perched on a watering troughA juvenile Burrowing Owl perched on a watering trough

You might wonder why I think it is tough being a bird photographer when it comes to Burrowing Owls.

A juvenile Burrowing Owl parallaxing on a sagebrushA juvenile Burrowing Owl parallaxing on a sagebrush

It isn’t because I get up so early to photograph them.

An adult Burrowing Owl giving me a look of curiosityAn adult Burrowing Owl giving me a look of curiosity

It isn’t because they are hard to find.

A pair of Juvenile Owl siblings perched on postsA pair of Juvenile Owl siblings perched on posts

Or that I drove 90 miles to get to where the Burrowing Owls are.

A juvenile Burrowing Owl framed by a barbed wire fenceA juvenile Burrowing Owl framed by a barbed wire fence

It isn’t because they are particularly difficult to photograph.

A juvenile Burrowing Owl looking at a vole on the groundA juvenile Burrowing Owl looking at a vole on the ground

And it isn’t because I have already been up nearly three and a half  hours by the time I get to where the owls are.

Juvenile Burrowing Owl parallaxing while perched on a fence postJuvenile Burrowing Owl parallaxing while perched on a fence post

It is tough because they are so funny that it is hard to suppress my laughter.

A young Burrowing Owl in early morning lightA young Burrowing Owl in early morning light

It is tough because I usually take a tons of images and that means…

A juvenile Burrowing Owl perched in front of a field of grainA juvenile Burrowing Owl perched in front of a field of grain

It is tough to weed through the images…

Burrowing Owl juvenile with a firm grip on sagebrushBurrowing Owl juvenile with a firm grip on sagebrush

And tough deciding which ones to keep.

A juvenile Burrowing Owl stare downA juvenile Burrowing Owl stare down

When you take over seven hundred images in one sitting that takes a long time to go through them all.

Looks like this juvenile Burrowing Owl needs some coffee!Looks like this juvenile Burrowing Owl needs some coffee!

But what is really tough is deciding which images to share because it is hard to get bad images of these cute desert owls. Yeah, I know. “Poor baby”. 🙂

So I figured what the heck, I’d share a Baker’s Dozen Burrowing Owl images that I created yesterday!

Life is good.

Mia

All images were taken with my Nikon D810, Nikkor 500mm VR with the 1.4x TC attached. Sorry there are no techs but there are just too many images!

13 Comments

  1. Stu July 27, 2015 at 8:59 pm

    A great fun series of ‘being stared at in a quizzical way’ photographs. Delightful Mia.. Excellent as always.

  2. Mia McPherson July 27, 2015 at 1:28 pm

    Thank you Steven, Sarah, Larry, Neil, Susan, Roger, Dave, Patty, Linda and EC.

    Susan, if there are pastures or shrubs like Sagebrush look for the Burrowing Owls there. They don’t like the shrubs too thick because they like open areas where they can hunt.

    Roger, I never went to Cape Coral for the owls, I should have though!

    Linda, I’ve had images published in National Geographic publications and I am still never sure about what they might find interesting enough to publish.

  3. Elephant's Child July 27, 2015 at 12:57 pm

    How you suffer.
    Here at my desk I can laugh out loud if I want – but I usually sit and smile. Awe and wonder. And gratitude.

  4. Linda July 27, 2015 at 11:03 am

    I do not think there can be too many burrowing owl pictures!!!

    But.., as an amateur photographer (AKA photo ho) I truly wrestle with issue of how to decide how many photos to share, how decide which I want to share, and how to decide which of a series of similar shots is ‘the best’. I constantly ask myself.. “I wonder how the national geographic photographers do it?” Not as much about how they got the marvelous shot(though of course I want to know that too!), but about how they choose the one they publish over all the other marvelous shots they take.

  5. Patty Chadwick July 27, 2015 at 11:01 am

    This is “the day before” for me…nothing’s better than seeing these funny, funny little owls…thought each one I came to was The funniest…then came to the last one! How you can keep you camera still enough to focus on these mini clowns is a miracle!!!

  6. Dave Sparks July 27, 2015 at 10:44 am

    A dozen burrowing owls shots every Monday works for me.

  7. Roger Burnard July 27, 2015 at 10:31 am

    Another great series Mia… When I’m in Sarasota, Fl., I sometimes drive south to the city of Cape Coral, Fl.
    There are a number of burrowing owls that can be found in vacant lots along the streets… sometimes even
    in peoples front lawns… Did you ever get a chance to visit Cape Coral when you were in Florida?

  8. Susan Stone July 27, 2015 at 9:36 am

    Delightful photos! I pretty much figured out what the problem was before reading the post all the way through. This is an outstanding collection. I just wish I knew where to go to see them in person. It would appear that they can be found in the next county over from us, but I wouldn’t even know where to start. The best baby bird entertainment we’ve had here is watching young Barn Swallows in a nest right over the door of the headquarters building at Hueco Tanks State Park & Historic Site (El Paso County, TX). They’re funny, but nothing like your Burrowing Owls. The owls are definitely worth the effort it takes to get to where they are.

  9. Neil Rossmiller July 27, 2015 at 7:57 am

    Sweet Morning outing, Mia. I can almost hear the chuckles, about 700 of them. TFS

  10. Larry Muench July 27, 2015 at 7:07 am

    Great shots Mia. They are adorable little birds and do evoke laughter like none other! I can relate to the drudgery of working through 700 images. Taking the photos is a lot of fun, editing them not so much!

  11. Sarah Mayhew July 27, 2015 at 7:04 am

    Great expressions! And I agree, they make me laugh!

  12. steven kessel July 27, 2015 at 6:21 am

    Poor you! You have my sympathy.

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