Fledgling Short-eared Owl Perched On A Tumbleweed – Two Years Ago Today

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Close up of a curious Short-eared Owl fledgling, Box Elder County, UtahClose up of a curious Short-eared Owl fledgling – Nikon D810, f8, 1/800, ISO 500, -0.7 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited

Two years ago today I had a fantastic time photographing Short-eared Owl fledglings on tumbleweeds that were in front a fence in northern Utah.  It was a great year for seeing adult, chicks and fledgling Short-eared Owls and I took full advantage of every opportunity I had with theses owls each and every time I was able to find them. It only makes sense with nomadic species to take as many photos as I can because the next year there may not be as many of them around.

Fledgling Short-eared Owl on a tumbleweed, Box Elder County, UtahFledgling Short-eared Owl on a tumbleweed – Nikon D810, f7.1, 1/1000, ISO 500, -0.7 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited

Also, I don’t have many opportunities to take photos of birds perched on tumbleweeds. I see plenty of tumbleweeds out here in the west but not many that have birds on them. Tumbleweeds don’t look all that sturdy to my eye but then Short-eared Owls don’t weigh that much either, only about 12 ounces full grown and this fledgling was smaller than an adult. Unlike other birds of prey who are as large as the adults when they fledge Short-eared Owls leave their ground based nests at about 12 to 18 days old which is before they can fly.

Fledgling Short-eared Owl perched on tumbleweed in early morning light, Box Elder County, UtahFledgling Short-eared Owl perched on tumbleweed in early morning light – Nikon D810, f7.1, 1/800, ISO 500, -1.0 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited

Today I wonder how the chicks I photographed are doing and if they are now raising their own young.

Life is good.

Mia

9 Comments

  1. Pepe Forte May 31, 2018 at 5:34 pm

    Great shots Mia. As always, the detail you capture is extraordinary. Wouldn’t the top pic of the owl looking sideways make a great t-shirt, or perhaps a greeting card? Just sayin’… I love your work. Thanks.

  2. David Sparks May 30, 2018 at 7:12 pm

    Wow! Terrific views of the owl.

  3. Rosemary Harris May 30, 2018 at 1:27 pm

    Awesome images love them all, but the first is precious.

  4. Elephants Child May 30, 2018 at 1:25 pm

    Any day I start with owls is a good day.
    Thank you.

  5. Patty Chadwick May 30, 2018 at 10:32 am

    As I’ve said before, “Short ears represent the essence of owlness”. LOVE them!!!

  6. Marty K May 30, 2018 at 8:19 am

    Love the parallaxing shot! I didn’t realize SEOs were less than a pound. Amazing! Thank you for the new tidbit of info — I love to learn something new early in the morning. 🙂

  7. April Olson May 30, 2018 at 7:26 am

    Some of my favorite photos you have shared through the years. It must have been a magical experience, one I’d like to see one day. I saw many adults last Monday but not any fledgies yet.

  8. Kim May 30, 2018 at 6:59 am

    Love these!

  9. Bob mcpherson May 30, 2018 at 6:49 am

    Beautiful. Love your owl photos. Mia.

Comments are closed.