Clark’s Nutcracker in the High Uintas

/, Clark's Nutcrackers, High Uintas, Summit County, Utah/Clark’s Nutcracker in the High Uintas

Clark's Nutcracker in the High UintasClark’s Nutcracker in the High Uintas – Nikon D200, handheld, f5.6, 1/1250, ISO 250, Nikkor 80-400mm VR at 400mm, natural light

I had some server issues this morning so my post is late. I was able to get the server running again but I am still running behind.

So, a quick post this morning of a Clark’s Nutcracker that I photographed in July of 2008 on my first trip to Utah to photograph birds prior to moving here in 2009. I felt fortunate to have several Clark’s Nutcracker foraging in conifers in the High Uintas though I wish I had been able to get better light on them the entire time they were close. Still those images are the best I have of this species to date. Since I took this image I have seen Clark’s Nutcrackers many times but they are always too far away.

Hoping to get better images of them in the future.

Life is good (and full of bumps).

Mia

8 Comments

  1. Humming Bird Lover February 7, 2015 at 7:07 am

    Hi! speaking of bumps? I got rid of one many, many years ago on a morning like this and The bump was gone and I had a beautiful baby Girl and she was YOU! What a wonderful gift from GOD! You keep a bright light in my life , Love ya much! Have a special day!

  2. Utahbooklover February 7, 2015 at 12:31 am

    Such a beautiful bird and a wonderful image. Fun to watch, I last saw one at Creator Lake in Oregon. I want to get back to the High Uintas someday soon — didn’t know Clark’s Nutcrackers were there.

    • Utahbooklover February 7, 2015 at 4:52 pm

      My spelling never was good but this deep lake and surrounding mountains are beautiful. “Crater Lake was formed when a massive eruption of Mount Mazama 7700 years ago caused the mountain to collapse, leaving a steaming caldera. Centuries of rain and snow filled the caldera.”

  3. Elephant's Child February 6, 2015 at 12:56 pm

    What a stunner. I really, really hope you find a cooperative one – or two.

  4. Patty Chadwick February 6, 2015 at 9:50 am

    Though quite different in many ways, this bird reminds me of our catbirds and mockingbirds…wonderful portrait….

  5. Bob Bushell February 6, 2015 at 8:12 am

    Wonderful bird.

  6. Ian Holland February 6, 2015 at 7:45 am

    I saw a bunch of those in the mountains a few years ago, before I became a camera nut. :-}

  7. Liz Cormack February 6, 2015 at 7:43 am

    Beautiful bird. Have never seen that bird before. Thank you.

Comments are closed.