Pair Of Coyotes And The Healing Journey of One

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Coyote resting on the edge of the Great Salt LakeA Coyote resting on the edge of the Great Salt Lake – Nikon D810, f10, 1/320, ISO 400, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

Any day that I see a Coyote is a great one, seeing a pair of them it is even greater and yesterday I photographed a pair of them I am very familiar with. The sun had been up long and there was still a golden glow to the light when I began to photograph the coyotes from the causeway overlooking the blue water of the Great Salt Lake. The larger of the two laid down right next to the shoreline.

Pair of Coyotes on the shore of the Great Salt LakeA pair of Coyotes on the shore of the Great Salt Lake – Nikon D810, f10, 1/320, ISO 400, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

And the other Coyote crossed the causeway and walked slowly up to the one on the shore. I know that second one well and have been following it since the 16th of February.

Coyote with a healed injuryA Coyote with a healed injury – Nikon D810, f10, 1/320, ISO 400, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

This Coyote was injured some time before the 16th of February and to see it healed now gives me a sense of relief and joy. When I saw it after its injury I was not 100% sure it would survive. But it has.

The Great Salt Lake and a resting CoyoteThe Great Salt Lake and a resting Coyote – Nikon D810, f10, 1/500, ISO 400, -0.3 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

I love seeing Coyotes especially along the shore of the Great Salt Lake.

Injured Coyote - February 16th, 2015Injured Coyote – February 16th, 2015 – Nikon D810, f7.1, 1/800, ISO 450, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

The first day I saw this Coyote with the injury was February 16th, I believe that the injury was caused by fighting over food or territory. In some photos I took that day you could see into the coyote’s nasal passage. It was not pretty and I wasn’t sure that the coyote would survive.

Injured Coyote - February 25, 2015Injured Coyote – February 25, 2015 – Nikon D810, f6.3, 1/1000, ISO 400, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

Nine days later though I photographed the injured Coyote and the healing process had begun. It looked and acted healthy.

Injured Coyote - March 6, 2015Injured Coyote – March 6, 2015 – Nikon D810, f8, 1/500, ISO 320, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

And nine days later I could see more healing.

Injured Coyote - April 28, 2015Injured Coyote – April 28, 2015 – Nikon D810, f7.1, 1/400, ISO 400, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

By the time I took this image on April 28th the healing process was pretty much finished with very little scarring to the Coyote’s muzzle but I can tell this is the same one because of the “Roman Nose”, a slight hump on the bridge of the muzzle.

Healed Coyote - June 7, 2015Healed Coyote – June 7, 2015 – Nikon D810, f10, 1/640, ISO 400, -0.3 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light, not baited or called in

Yesterday when I took this image of the Coyote curled up in the morning sun it felt good to know that nature healed it and I have been privileged to photograph this beautiful animal on the path of its recovery.

Life is good.

Mia

9 Comments

  1. Phaedra Greenwood June 8, 2015 at 8:31 pm

    Glad to see this coyote’s nose healed up. They do look a little skinny compared to the coyotes around Taos, or the ones on Antelope Island.
    Thanks for showing us these photos.

    Cheers!

    Phaedra Greenwood

  2. Utahbooklover June 8, 2015 at 6:01 pm

    Love those images by the lake and the photographic proof of how resilient coyote are, except when facing M44:

    The M44 cyanide device (also called a ‘cyanide gun’ or a ‘cyanide trap’) is used for the elimination of suspected livestock predators, such as coyotes blamed for the loss of profits. It lures predators with an attractive smell, often from a small piece of bait, then uses a spring to propel a dosage of sodium cyanide into the predator’s mouth. The sodium cyanide combines with water in the mouth to produce poisonous cyanide gas.

    The M44 was invented in the 1960s to replace a different device known as a ‘coyote-getter’ which made use of powdered cyanide ejected by a primer. The M44 reduces the risk to humans from the earlier device.[1] They are considered relatively safe because of the high level of selectivity they’re supposed to afford.

    Use of the M44 device has been criticised by animal welfare and environmental groups, as the devices have many unintended victims, including pets and endangered species; strongly indicative of a lack of selectivity, instead of the supposed high level. In 2003, Mr. Dennis Slaugh of Vernal, Utah, was on public lands and mistook an M-44 for a survey marker. When he pulled on it, the device shot sodium cyanide powder on his face and chest causing him to become violently ill.[2] In February 2006, an M44 device killed a man’s dog in Utah, as the dog and owner were walking through public land. The man was also affected by the cyanide in the device, and is seeking compensation from the US Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Service, along with the Utah Department of Food and Agriculture.[3] Wikipedia

  3. Lois Bryan June 8, 2015 at 5:24 pm

    I love happy endings … beautiful images!!!

  4. Elephant's Child June 8, 2015 at 2:07 pm

    WONDERFUL news. Thanks for passing it on.

  5. Patty Chadwick June 8, 2015 at 7:55 am

    Happy! Happy! Happy! That’s how this outcome makes me feel on this dreary, gray, rainy morning…Thank you for sharing it!

  6. Susan Stone June 8, 2015 at 6:54 am

    It gives me goosebumps to see pictures of this coyote. I remember it very well and am happy to see that it has healed and is doing well. Thank you for starting out my day with such good news.

  7. Alex (stu) June 8, 2015 at 6:46 am

    Wow, I remember the original post of yours showing the injury. Wonderful to see that nature worked its wonders on this coyote soul. I am going to use this as a metaphor for my son.. A sign that things will heal. Thanks for the wonderful images.

  8. Ian Holland June 8, 2015 at 6:37 am

    Great photo opportunity! The injured one is indeed lucky to survive without infection!

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