Quiet Morning Spent with the Birds of Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge

Black-necked Stilt juvenile at Bear River NWRBlack-necked Stilt juvenile at Bear River NWR – Nikon D810, f9, 1/640, ISO 500, -0.7 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

I headed up to Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge yesterday morning and I am very glad I did because of the wonderful birds I saw. As I drove north the sky cleared and I knew I would have good light. I hadn’t been to the refuge in just over a month and I was curious about the birds I might see because month to month and year to year there are differences due to water levels and the availability of food.

The first shorebirds I could photograph were Black-necked Stilts that were feeding in the shallow water. This juvenile’s parent was close by keeping an eye on its chick.

A juvenile Willet at Bear River NWRA juvenile Willet at Bear River NWR – Nikon D810, f9, 1/1000, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

Then I came across one solitary juvenile Willet on the auto tour route road that was hanging around with some Black-necked Stilts.

Juvenile American Coot nibbling on veggiesJuvenile American Coot nibbling on veggies – Nikon D810, f9, 1/1250, ISO 500, -0.3 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

And then I found a juvenile American Coot pigging out on some underwater vegetation. They might be common but I stopped for it anyway. I don’t have that many images of them at this stage of maturity.

Great Blue Heron lifting off from a stand of rushesGreat Blue Heron lifting off from a stand of rushes – Nikon D810, f8, 1/2500, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

I saw a Great Blue Heron resting on top of a mound of rushes and pulled off to the side so I could take images of it if it took off and it did eventually fly away…

A fluffed up Marsh WrenA fluffed up Marsh Wren – Nikon D810, f8, 1/1600, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

But before the heron flew off this Marsh Wren flew in close and caught my eye so I couldn’t resist photographing it. It didn’t hang around long but I did get about 6 images of it.

Pied-billed Grebe in breeding plumagePied-billed Grebe in breeding plumage – Nikon D810, f7.1, 1/1600, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

I also couldn’t resist photographing this Pied-billed Grebe in breeding plumage as it swam slowly past me heading towards the west.

I saw a few people fishing on my way in and only one other photographer on the auto tour route. It was a quiet, delightful morning spent with the birds on the refuge.

Life is good.

Mia

6 Comments

  1. Mia McPherson July 23, 2015 at 2:19 pm

    Thanks Roger, Mom, Patty, EC and Utahbooklover!

  2. Utahbooklover July 20, 2015 at 10:26 pm

    Nice weather and light make for some great images, especially the first one. Thanks!

  3. Elephant's Child July 20, 2015 at 12:50 pm

    What a glorious start to the day – yours and mine as I settle down to ogle at your captures. Thank you.

  4. Patty Chadwick July 20, 2015 at 11:46 am

    What a nice series! Especially like the elegant stilt in the first shot and the young willet. Glad you’re seeing so many birds and a nice variety…..and not so many strange birds of the human variety. That’s a nice relief. That’s an unusual shot of a wren, fluffed up and mouth closed, but cute….

  5. Humming Bird Lover July 20, 2015 at 9:46 am

    HI You really did get some wonderful shots of many birds! So Happy you were able to go and have fun! Keep up the great shooting!

  6. Roger Burnard July 20, 2015 at 6:56 am

    VERY NICE SERIES MIA…. WAY TO GO!!! ;-)))

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