Song Sparrows – Out in the Open and Partially Hidden from View

/, Birds, Box Elder County, Davis County, Song Sparrows, Utah/Song Sparrows – Out in the Open and Partially Hidden from View

Song Sparrow in northern UtahSong Sparrow in northern Utah – Nikon D500, f7.1, 1/800, ISO 400, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

Most of the time I prefer to have the birds I photograph out in the open without obstructions in front of the birds, with silky smooth backgrounds caused by the bokeh of my lens and where the primary focus of interest is completely on the bird. Those type of photos are what some people call “guide book quality” and for good reason which is because guide books are often used to help identify the species and fewer distractions are better in that case.

This Song Sparrow photographed in northern Utah was out in the open and could easily be used in a guide book because it shows the bird well and the background isn’t all that distracting, the foreground is clear and this photo shows many of the key ID features of the Song Sparrow that can be used to help narrow it down to its species.

Song Sparrow peeking out of a greasewoodSong Sparrow peeking out of a greasewood – Nikon D500, f7.1, 1/2000, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

I also enjoy taking images that aren’t what people would call “guide book quality” where the bird might be small in the frame or where the part of the bird is hidden from view. I often call this type of bird photo “hidden treasures“.

This Song Sparrow photo is one of those images that I find appealing but mostly likely would never be used in a guide book because the tail and legs are hidden by the out of focus greasewood and the bird is small in the frame too. Some people may even consider this type of bird photo more “artsy”. The photo might work well in a magazine or online article but I don’t really think about that while I am creating a photo, I take them solely for me.

I can’t pick a favorite between these two Song Sparrow photos because I find them both visually appealing and I don’t feel a need or a desire to pick one over the other. But I’m just a bird photographer who knows what she likes to photograph.

Life is good.

Mia

8 Comments

  1. Pepe Forte October 11, 2017 at 1:55 pm

    So incredible. I think the first pic is the best photo of a sparrow I have ever seen. The detail you captured is astounding. Thanks Mia.

  2. Elephants Child October 11, 2017 at 1:30 pm

    Both are treasures. As you know.

  3. Walt Anderson October 11, 2017 at 11:44 am

    I appreciate both styles. Your images brighten our days!

  4. Patty Chadwick October 11, 2017 at 11:27 am

    Sorry about duplication…darned thing is doing it again…nothing happens, so I try agsin…again, nothing happens, then suddenly there are duplicates..it really does hate me!!!

  5. Patty Chadwick October 11, 2017 at 11:24 am

    I love these images…especially the first for its little pinkish “spray” of leaves and catkins and the second for its sassy-looking little, partially raised-crest cutie….both birds and settings are wonderful…

  6. Patty Chadwick October 11, 2017 at 11:24 am

    I love these images…especially the first for its little pinkish “spray” of leaves and catkins and the second for its sassy-looking little, partially raised-crest cutie….both birds and settings are wonderful…

  7. Bruce McCammon October 11, 2017 at 7:10 am

    Both are nice portraits. As you say, both have value and beauty. I tend to favor birds in some environmental context when I photograph bit I still Love a clean, clear frame filling shot that can be used for ID and to study feather details. Keep shooting for yourself Mia -I enjoy the results. Please keep writing too. Your words frequently frame my thoughts and experiences. Thanks.

  8. www.timtraver.net October 11, 2017 at 6:25 am

    Both are beautiful. I like the way the lower bird is framed by the circle of tan color in the background. It looks intentional but maybe that was just a stroke of good luck. Thanks as always for sharing. We’re seeing lots of song sparrows and other sparrows in the yard as always at the tail end of fall migration.

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