Yellow Warbler Perched and Foraging in a Mystery Flowering, Thorny Tree

/, East Canyon, Morgan County, Utah, Yellow Warblers/Yellow Warbler Perched and Foraging in a Mystery Flowering, Thorny Tree

Yellow Warbler foraging in a flowering, thorny tree, East Canyon, Morgan County, UtahYellow Warbler foraging in a flowering, thorny tree – Nikon D500, f8, 1/1000, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

I drove my mother up into some the the canyons in the Wasatch Mountains yesterday so she could see some of the canyons there where I photograph birds and other wildlife. The morning was bright, clear and the temps were cool but not cold. We saw plenty of birds and some wildlife, listened to the creek gurgling next to the road in places, and listened to the bird songs coming from the sagebrush, willows and those birds who were on the wing.

When I had the opportunity to photograph a Yellow Warbler foraging in a flowering tree I jumped at the chance. Right after I took this photo the warbler snatched a tiny insect from the flowers but I couldn’t make out what it was.

Yellow Warbler with tilted head, East Canyon, Morgan County, UtahYellow Warbler with tilted head – Nikon D500, f8, 1/1000, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

Then the bird tilted its head towards my Jeep before it flew off to another branch to look for more insects.

I didn’t notice the huge thorns on the tree until after I went back home and viewed my images on my monitor. Those are some big thorns! I don’t know what this tree is and if anyone does know please feel free to identify it here. I’m very curious as to what kind of tree it is.

Yellow Warbler perched on a flowering, thorny tree, East Canyon, Morgan County, UtahYellow Warbler perched on a flowering, thorny tree – Nikon D500, f8, 1/1000, ISO 500, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light

When the Yellow warbler moved to another branch I had a bluer background which I liked tremendously because it contrasted so nicely from the bright yellow bird.

My mother enjoyed her trip up into the canyons and perhaps we will go back up there again while she is here visiting me.

Life is good. Sharing the birds I see and photograph in person with my Mom makes it even better.

Mia

9 Comments

  1. Pepe Forte May 20, 2018 at 5:15 pm - Reply

    Another terrific series of pics with wonderful commentary. So cool. Thanks Mia.

  2. Ken Schneider May 17, 2018 at 4:58 am - Reply

    Here in Florida there are so many unusual and invasive trees. As you did, I often ask for the ID on social media. My problem is that the next time I encounter the same species it looks familiar but I can’t remember its name (dragonflies do that to me too). One interesting tree upon which posed a Mourning Dove provided a delightful setting for a bird of peace. Then I learned that the tree was a Castor Oil Tree, source of ricin, the deadly poison– an odd juxtaposition of photographic subjects!

  3. Elephants Child May 16, 2018 at 1:32 pm - Reply

    What a glorious splash of colour.
    I am so very glad that you and your mother are having a great time together.

  4. Patty Chadwick May 16, 2018 at 9:20 am - Reply

    What a wonderful series! The last is my favorite, too, but like all of them…these little flitting pieces of sunshine hold a special plce in my heart!

  5. Marty K May 16, 2018 at 8:44 am - Reply

    Beautiful! I think the last image is my favorite. Glad you and your mom were able to have such a nice time together. 😃

  6. Jane Chesebrough May 16, 2018 at 8:27 am - Reply

    I find it hard to spot warblers , and when I do, hard to get close enough to get a good image. I am not giving up, however, in fact it is an excuse to get outdoors to seek and find. Lovely captures, Mia!

  7. Neil Rossmiller May 16, 2018 at 7:29 am - Reply

    Looks to be Red Hawthorn. We are on the southern extremities of it’s range, along with Black Hawthorn, which extends up into Alaska. The fruit is one of the last to be consumed here. Large flocks of Robins strip the trees bare in the fall migration. Difficult to work with in that the branching usually intertwine at about 90 degrees to the main branching and macramé’s themselves into an impenetrable thicket. Expect to give blood when working with them. My favorite wood to burn in the winter. Retribution for all of my scars.

  8. Bob mcpherson May 16, 2018 at 7:16 am - Reply

    Nice

  9. Tim Traver May 16, 2018 at 6:19 am - Reply

    Buckthorn?

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